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Changing the world one student at a time

With character development at the core of Chadwick International’s ethos, community service is a defining aspect of learning that encourages students at all levels to make valuable contributions to their communities. In the process, they gain priceless perspectives beyond the classroom, realize their own power to produce positive change and develop a lasting commitment to service. They also discover the sheer joy and gratification of helping others.

Service is an integral and defining part of the Chadwick experience that enriches learning by exposing students to real people, places and problems. By applying what they learn in class to communities beyond it, students expand their world view and deepen their understanding of global and social concepts. It’s also a chance for them to discover new interests. 

 

In the Middle and Upper Schools, service is part of the regular schedule. A diverse and dynamic range of service opportunities are offered on a weekly, monthly, and annual basis. These activities can occur on campus, in local areas off-campus and in communities abroad. Students are encouraged to identify projects and activities they’re passionate about. With the guidance of their teachers, many initiate grassroots clubs that raise funds and take targeted action toward the cause of their choice. Others participate in pre-existing organizations in their communities (e.g., participating in their local church). As they explore new avenues for their passions, they discover the kind of people they are.

Chadwick International works with organizations throughout Korea and beyond.  To inquire about partnering with Chadwick for your service initiative, please contact Jody Betram (jbertram@chadwickschool.org)

Service is a critical component of a Chadwick education that is incorporated into our weekly schedule. We want to make sure EVERY student is exposed to opportunities to be of service to others while developing their own character and ability to lead.

Jody Bertram, Service Coordinator

Village School Service 

Engaging in service sets Village School students on a lifelong path of giving. These experiences encourage collaboration, creativity, resourcefulness and critical thinking. They’re also tied to classroom coursework which takes learning to a whole new level. Helping others builds character and expands their view of what’s possible. By participating in acts of generosity — like  selling student-designed T-shirts to raise awareness for Ethiopian children who work to support their families — they learn that small actions can have a tremendous impact. They learn what it means to be empathetic, caring, mutually understanding and respectful. 

 

Middle School Service

Chadwick’s mission to develop global citizens with the ability to lead is what guides the Middle School service program. Students are encouraged to step up and take ownership of their service. They learn to focus less on themselves and more on how they can better the world around them. As students advance through these critical years in their development, they become more independent and are encouraged to seek deeper and more individualized service experiences. Involvement in Middle School In Action activities (MSAs) connects their curriculum to service activities, where possible, for deeper learning experiences that make lasting impressions. From helping the homeless in Seoul to supporting a school feeding program in the Philippines, Chadwick Middle School students are making a profound difference. 

Some of the many Middle School service clubs:

  • Animal Welfare
  • Community Garden
  • English Translation Services
  • Global Issues Network
  • MSA Happiness Project 
  • Nepal Service Learning
  • Philippines Service Learning
  • Pushcart Library
  • Roundsquare
  • Sports Exploratory

SPOTLIGHT: PHILIPPINES SERVICE PROJECT

The Philippines Service Project took Middle Schools students to Labo Camarines Norte, Philippines, where they partnered with Alaska Milk Corporation to provide breakfast and lunch for about 50 students from Aniceta De Lara Pimentel High School and 60 students from Labo Science and Technology School. They also improved the students’ educational environment by replacing worn out products and materials. 

Video of service trip to Philippines

 

Upper School Service 

The Upper School offers over 50 clubs and activities that develop rich character and self-knowledge while impacting communities in need. Chadwick students visit centers in the local Songdo community to teach English, spend quality time with elders, support education for orphans and encourage a love of music for those less fortunate. Seeing the world from perspectives entirely different from their own leaves an undeniable impression that emboldens their humanity. Students are encouraged to submit proposals for new clubs that spark their interest and serve an unmet need in the community. 

The CAS project also gives students an opportunity to pursue their individual interests in an extended project.

 

Some of the many Upper School Service Clubs

  • Alliance for Multicultural Women
  • Amnesty International
  • Chadwick Fund for Nature
  • Elderly Care
  • Global Issues Network (GIN)
  • Hwarang: Philippines Service Learning Club
  • Interact (supporting the disabled community)
  • Kenya Service Club
  • Key Club (supporting UNICEF)
  • Student’s Vision for Children
  • Two for One (supporting North Korean teens)

Service Council 

The service council is a group of “service-minded” students whose aim is to promote service, create awareness and support others in meeting the goals of their service clubs. They hold several events each year with an aim to build a philanthropic culture and create opportunities for all students to get involved in service activities. 

SPOTLIGHT: KENYA SERVICE PROJECT

The Kenya project provided learning equipment such as braille machines, embossed paper and audiobooks to the students of the Likoni School for the Visually Impaired. These children have no home beyond the school and most have been rejected by society. Students were proud to support them on their quest for a new beginning. 

Service Learning